Volvo

Volvo’s focus on safety, design and function appeal to customers in Moscow.

Every year, Volvo Cars exports 16,000 cars to Russia. 8000 of them come from the Volvo plant in Gothenburg. Even back in the 1970s Volvo sold cars to diplomats in Moscow in the former Soviet Union. Nowadays it is primarily the upper middle class that for the most part buys the larger models in the Volvo range.

But it all begins in Torslanda

Day
1
Day
1

From Torslanda to the whole world

Just five minutes from the Port of Gothenburg lies the Torslanda plant. This is Volvo Cars’ own home production plant, with more than 200,000 cars built here every year. Almost 5000 people work in shifts here, building a wide range of Volvo models: the S60, V60, V70, XC70, S80, S90, V90 and XC90. When the cars are ready they are loaded onto transporters and taken to the Port of Gothenburg.

  • Half a million cars
    Every year about half a million Volvo cars are built and sold the world over. The Torslanda plant manufactures almost half these cars, which are then shipped out across the world from the Port of Gothenburg. Volvo’s first car was exported in 1928 – to Finland. Just three years later the first car was exported across the Atlantic, to Cuba.
  • Between 7 and 11 cars are loaded onto each car transporter.

  • Almost all the cars are taken to the Port of Gothenburg for export throughout the world.

  • 5minutes

    The port is located just 6 kilometres from the Torslanda plant so the journey takes just five minutes.

Day
1
Day
1

Sweden’s biggest export port for cars

When the cars arrive at the Port of Gothenburg they are parked in long lines in the car terminal at Logent Ports & Terminals. The Port of Gothenburg is Sweden’s largest export port for vehicles, with almost 180,000 cars loaded and unloaded here every year.

With car ferries to St. Petersburg

Volvos destined for Russia are loaded onto a special car ferry that can carry almost 1500 vehicles. Once the ship docks and the ramp is in place, a team of about 40 to 50 people drive the cars on board. Everyone who drives these cars wears white disposable overalls so the new cars do not get dirty. The cars are parked close to each other and tied down so they remain firmly in place during the voyage to St. Petersburg.

  • Volvo Cars’ main export port
    The Port of Gothenburg has long been Volvo Cars’ main port for vehicle exports. From here Volvo Cars sends cars to many parts of the world, including Finland, Russia and China.
  • 3days

    The cars are transported across the Kattegat and Baltic Sea to St. Petersburg. The trip takes 3 days.

  • Belgian shipping line Euro Marine Logistics (EML) has scheduled departures direct to St. Petersburg every week.

  • 8000cars

    The world’s biggest car ferry is 231 metres long and can carry 8000 cars on its 13 decks.

Day
4
Day
4

Welcome to Russia!

St. Petersburg is Russia’s second-largest city. It also has the country’s largest port, and ships carrying Volvos dock at the Sea Fishing Port terminal in Ugol'naya Harbour. The terminal has six piers totalling 670 metres in length. Here the vehicles are unloaded onto car trailers for onward transport to Moscow.

  • 700kilometres

    The distance from St. Petersburg to Moscow is 700 kilometres.

  • The trip by car transporter takes 8 hours.

Day
5
Day
5

Ready for customers in Moscow

After a trip of 2300 kilometres the Volvos finally reach Moscow. This is Volvo Cars’ biggest market in Russia and there are several dealers here who sell Volvos.

Summary

Climate-smart to transport cars by sea

A Volvo XC90 sold in Moscow has travelled 2300 kilometres to get there. Most of the trip is by sea, which is a climate-smart way of transporting large quantities of goods. Transporting a Volvo from Gothenburg to Moscow produces 270 kg of CO2 per car. Although the sea route is more than twice as long as getting there by road, it generates the same amount of CO2 as the far shorter road journey.

SHOW ALL EXPORTSUCCESSES

Read about another journey