Kopparberg Cider

The balmy beaches of Australia and Swedish cider have proved to be a highly popular combination. Kopparberg cider has become an increasingly common beverage on the other side of the globe in recent years.

Kopparberg has been exporting cider to Australia since 2013 and it has been a consistently strong growth market ever since. But before the cider has a chance to quench the thirst of the Australians it needs to be transported more than 20,000 km – 99 per cent by sea.

Day
1
Day
1

The most sold pear cider in the world

Located in the County of Västmanland is the small town of Kopparberg with a population of around 4,000. The town also has a brewery of the same name that produces the most sold pear cider in the world.

  • Exported to more than 30 countries
    Kopparberg cider is sold in more than 30 countries and is the company’s number one export.

First by road, then by rail to the Port of Gothenburg

The cider’s journey to Australia begins with a 110 km trip by road to the rail hub in the town of Hallsberg. This first leg is equivalent to 0.5 per cent of the total journey, or half a teaspoon of cider from a half-litre bottle.

  • On arrival in Hallsberg, the cider is transferred from pallets to containers for onward transport by rail to the Port of Gothenburg.

  • 5hours

    The rail journey takes five hours.

  • Almost half the containers transported to and from the Port of Gothenburg arrive by rail.

Day
2
Day
2

From train to vessel

The Port of Gothenburg is the largest port in Scandianvia with a liner services all over the world - every day. The rail shuttle with Kopparberg Cider goes all the way in to the container terminal, APM Terminals Gothenburg, where the containers are loaded onto the vessel.

  • The largest port in Scandinavia
    The Port of Gothenburg has the largest container terminal in the Nordic region. Operated by APM Terminals, more than 15 shipping companies make regular calls. Many vessels sail directly to other parts of the world without transhipment. Other vessels are used to service freight hubs on the continent, where the containers are transferred to larger vessels.
  • The exact route taken by Kopparberg cider to Australia varies. This particular delivery is being handled by the shipping company MSC, which transports the cider from the Port of Gothenburg to Le Havre in France via a transhipment terminal at the Port of Hamburg in Germany.

  • Le Havre is the largest container port in France. It is one of the few European ports that offer direct services to Australia, which means that large volumes of European freight are gathered there, together with the cider from Kopparberg, in preparation for the long voyage to Australia.

  • 37 days

    The final leg by sea – via the Atlantic, Mediterranean, Red Sea and Indian Ocean – takes 37 days.

  • On the transocean voyage between Le Havre and Sydney, the cider is carried on the giant MSC Oscar. She and her sister ships, Oliver, Zoe and Maya, are the largest container vessels in the world. A couple of these vessels also call at the Port of Gothenburg.

Day
39
Day
39

Welcome to Sydney!

The container port in Sydney is Port Botany and is the second-largest container port in Australia.

  • On arrival at Port Botany, the consignment is collected by the Australian freight company Toll.

  • 900km

    The 900 km journey to Brisbane along the east coast of Australia takes 11 hours by road.

Day
41
Day
41

Final destination - Brisbane

When the container carrying the cider reaches the Carlton & United Breweries distribution centre in Brisbane, it is opened for the first time since it was sealed in Hallsberg. From here, the cider is loaded into smaller units for onward transport by van to Dan Murphy’s in the district of Buddina, just a few hundred metres from the Australian east coast.


Dan Murphy’s is Australia’s largest retailer of alcoholic beverages and has the widest range in the country. The company’s 200 outlets are located throughout Australia. Dan Murphy’s in Kawana is popular among the many surfers in the area looking to quench their thirst after a day riding the waves. Kopparberg cider would certainly fit the bill.

Summary

A journey to the other side of the world

The cider travels 21,500 km before it reaches the store. Some 99 per cent of this journey takes place in containers, which are exceptionally efficient in transport terms and offer low emissions per bottle/km. Although the sea leg of the journey accounts for 86 per cent of the distance, it only generates 48 per cent of the carbon emissions.

Think...

If the cider had been transported by road instead, the bottle would have only reached Iran – but with the same energy use and carbon emissions. A distance of just 6,000 km compared to the 21,500 km to Australia.

SHOW ALL EXPORTSUCCESSES

Read about another journey